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And finally, a year and a bit later, I reach the end of this challenge. It’s been really helpful for getting my head around what I have and what I don’t have. Anyway, for this final week I have included more than one ancestor: John Stevens and his parents (and beyond). I cannot claim to have undertaken all the research – much of the information (especially the earlier years) has come from another researcher, but where possible I have confirmed the dates.

John was born in about 1715 in St Ives, Cornwall. He was baptised on 24 March 1714/15 (pre-Gregorian calendar).  John was the son of Vivian Stevens and Anne Sprigg. He married El(e)anor Penrose (or Prouse, depending on which website you look at) by licence on 25 March 1738 in St Buryan to the south-west of St Ives. John was a lawyer, then mayor of St Ives and had 13, maybe 14 children:  John (1739); Anne (1740); Vivian (b. 1741, d. 1741); Francis (b. 1743, d. 1744); Francis (1744); Eleanor (1745); Mary (1747); Vivian Francis Penrose (b. 1749 but the long name didn’t prevent his early death in 1750); Elizabeth (1750); Jane (1752); Andrew (1754); and Thomas and Henry (1756). According to the other researcher there was also a Susannah born in 1758 but I have not been able to find a baptism.

John was listed as a lawyer or attorney up until about 1741 in the baptisms and burial of children, and then as a mayor from 1743. Unfortunately, later entries don’t give John’s’ occupation. Eleanor died in 1785, buried on 16 August in St Ives. John died in 1791, buried on 9 September in St Ives.

Vivian Stevens, John’s father, was baptised on 16 February 1685 in Towednack, Cornwall. His parents were Andrew and Elizabeth Stevens. He had two confirmed siblings – sisters, Ann and Margery. According to various records, Vivian was a merchant, collector and alderman.

Vivian married Anne Sprigg on 31 January 1711 in St Ives. They had five children that I know of, including John: Elizabeth (1712); (John); Andrew (1717); Anne (1720); and Catherine (1723) – children of “Mr” Vivian Stevens (and Anne).

Vivian died in 1735, buried on 16 October in St Ives. It was noted he was a “collector” – of what I wonder. I imagine it was some sort of profession such as collecting taxes. If he was born in 1685, that made him only 50 when he died.

Anne lived on to 1764, buried on 6 December in St Ives.  It is Anne’s family that is interesting, in that it can be traced back further. It’s often the female line on “Who Do You Think You Are?” that reveals fascinating history.

Anne’s parents were Thomas Sprigg and Ann Hammond. She was baptised on either the 10th or 16th December 1685 in St Ives (depending on whether the transcriber could read the second digit – if only I could see the original). Thomas Sprigg(e) married Ann on 20 November 1677 in St Ives.

Thomas was baptised on 30 November 1655, the eldest son of Robert Sprigg(s) (no mother mentioned, and I can’t find a marriage for Robert) as far as I know. Thomas had two sisters and a brother – Mary, Elizabeth, and John.

Now comes the stuff from yet another family researcher at ancestry that I can’t confirm, and so, at this point, is pure speculation. It would be great if I could find confirmation. Apparently Robert Sprigg (who died in 1667 in St Ives) was the son of Thomas Spriggs and Margery Anderton. I have not been able to find a baptism for Robert so can’t confirm or deny. Nor can I find a marriage for Thomas and Margery.

Thomas was apparently the son of John Sprigg and Pascoe James, but again I can’t find a baptism or marriage, so don’t know where this information came from. Thomas apparently died in 1663. I can confirm the baptism of John Sprigg on 26 November 1566 in Bodmin, Cornwall. Whether he’s a valid ancestor or not remains to be seen. He was the son of Robert Sprigg (and, apparently, Agnes Hendye). I did find a marriage of Robert and Agnes for 2 September 1565 in Bodmin.

Robert was, apparently, born in 1545 and died in 1596. He was the son of David Spriggs (who, apparently, was born in 1505 but that would make him 40 years old when Robert was born, or at least, baptised). David apparently died in 1559.

It would be amazing if it could all be confirmed, reaching back towards the end of the 15th century(!), but as I don’t know from where or how the information was obtained, it will have to stay theoretical. (You can’t trust anything on ancestry. One “researcher” had attached my Scottish grandmother to her family of totally unrelated people.)

So this brings me to the end of the challenge. It’s been tremendously helpful and made me realise how much I still have to find out – so many relatives, so little time, so little stuff online. I need to look at originals, especially since different transcribers give different dates, unable to read digits clearly.  (So lots of planning to do to enable me to visit the records.)

Naturally, I’ll continue to update this blog with other finds or observations.  Thanks for reading!

 

Sources: findmypast; familysearch; Cornwall OPC database; west-penwith.org.uk/ivesbur4.htm; sallenbach.net; wikipedia; http://www.ancestry.com.au/genealogy/records/john-sprigg_63672852

I received an email from familysearch just yesterday, claiming that I had an American pioneer in the family.  Well, my first thought was that it was just a lure to get you to search records (ancestry’s marketing technique) and that they should get their facts right first, cos I wasn’t American.  So, despite going “pfft, yeah right” in my head, I clicked on the link and was presented with information about Frances Tibble and family.  Frances was among about 242 people in 30-odd wagons who travelled from Wyoming to Utah in 1868 with the “William S. Seeley” company, obviously a group of Mormans.

Turns out this is Frances Grunsell, the cousin of my paternal great-grandfather’s mother.  She married Thomas Tibble in Hampshire,  had four or five kids and they emigrated to the States in 1865.  Well, who knew?  I have distant Mormon relatives in Salt Lake city.  Funny.

I also worked on Anne Spriggs yesterday.  I found her marriage which said she was Mrs Spriggs, so I vainly looked for an earlier marriage, thinking this wasn’t her maiden name.  However, after some consultation with a Cornwall group on Facebook, I was told that Mrs in earlier times stood for mistress, which meant that she was of a higher class.  Again, who knew?  Considering that I already had her baptism, parents, etc, I was glad that I didn’t have to chuck all that away.  I’ve probably mentioned it before but previous research has taken Anne’s family back to about 1505.  I can’t, however, confirm many of the dates on the tree.  I’m not sure where they got the information from – from records that aren’t online or indexed, evidently.

So my “methodical” research has gone off on tangents lately.  Must focus again.