You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Mudd’ category.

Eliza Gooch was likely born about 1809 or 1810. The only record I can find is for a birth on 11 August 1808 at Ipswich, Suffolk, and baptism on 22 April 1810 at Bury St Edmonds (or alternatively Bury St Mary, depending on which website you look at), Suffolk, daughter of William Gooch and Mary Lenny.

However, the announcement of her marriage to Thomas Mudd states that her father was George Gooch, merchant.  Perhaps his name was William George or George William. I have, so far, been unable to find the birth or baptism of an Eliza, daughter of a George.

thosmuddwed

If her father was William, she had at least four other siblings, one of which was a girl (and Eliza is George’s only daughter by 1829).  Some more research on George Gooch is needed.

In any case, after marrying Thomas Mudd, Eliza lived at Creeting St Peter on her husband’s farm.  Unfortunately, as I have no real information on the wives of ancestors, Eliza included, I have to concentrate on the children.

Their first child, George Thomas (indicating that yes, her father’s name was George), was baptised in 1830. I don’t have the details yet.  The second child, William Benjamin (perhaps her father was George William) was born in about 1833, but not baptised until 30 June 1837 at Creeting St Peter. Also baptised on that day was a daughter, Susan Elizabeth, who was born in about 1834, and another son, John Marmaduke, born about 1836. The next son, Richard, must have been born after June 1837 because he was baptised on 26 October 1837.  And finally, before the census, Catherine Sarah was born in about April 1841.  She was not baptised until 29 May 1852 (or 1853, again depending on which website you look at).

Mary Ann was born in about 1843 and baptised on the same day as her sister Catherine (this time it’s stated as 1853). The third child to be baptised on the same day (they believed in batch baptisms, this family, and why not if it cost money) was Emily who was born about 1849. This time the year of baptism is stated as 1852, but the same date of 29 May. Someone seems to have had trouble distinguishing a 2 from a 3 (surely it would have been obvious if the entries were in chronological order, having done transcriptions myself).  Just to make matters even more confusing, yet another child was baptised on 29 May “1852”, Edgar Herbert, who, according to census returns, was born in 1853. Thankfully that was the last child and the last batch of baptisms.

The children are all listed on the 1851 census, living in the same place. Edgar had not yet been born.  In 1859 the eldest, George Thomas, married Celia Kerridge, and in 1860 Mary Ann married William Rose. In the 1861 census Thomas was listed with his sons, William and John, and daughters, Catherine and Emily and little Edgar. Eliza and Susan were visiting Mary Ann in Framlingham.  Unfortunately, the fourth son, Richard had died in 1859.

Susan married Isaac Reynolds in 1865. Then in March 1869 George Thomas died before his father (who died in August that year).

Eliza continued running the farm after Thomas died, and in the 1871 census was listed as a farmer of 200 acres employing eight labourers and one boy, so she was obviously doing well. William, Emily, and Edgar were still living with her. Staying with them were three adult nieces, Sarah Anne, Mary Anne, and Jessie Kate Mudd. I don’t know who their parents were. I have found a Sarah Anne and Mary Anne Mudd, daughters of Robert and Mary Ann Mudd, born in Polstead, but have no idea who Robert Mudd is. I can find nothing for Jessie Kate.

Emily married Thomas Cooper in 1872.

emilywed

William married quite late in 1876 to Rosa Kerridge.

In 1881, Eliza was still a farmer at Grove Farm, farming 80 acres and employing two men and a boy. Her son, John, was farming the rest, 112 acres, employing three men and a boy. Living with them both was Edgar, age 28. He never married, and I don’t think John did either.

Eliza died, still at the farm, on 3 June 1888.

elizamudd

 

Sources: familysearch; findmypast; British newspaper archives; family archives

 

I’m late again with updating. Week 32 will be in a few days.

Thomas Mudd was born on 26 June 1807 in Badley, Suffolk, and baptised on 16 September the same year. His parents were Richard Mudd and Ann Cooper who had 10 children. Thomas, as far as I know, was the third child (and second son).  I think Richard was a farmer.

Thomas was only 18 when he married his first wife, Susannah Maria How, on 19 September 1825 at Haughley, Suffolk. Sadly, she died the following year in Haughley.

It was three more years before the widower, Thomas, married Eliza Gooch on 30 September 1829 in Ipswich.  Their first son, George, was born in 1830 in Creeting St Peter, Suffolk. By the time of the 1841 census the couple had three more boys and two girls, all born at Creeting or Creeting St Peter. In the census the family of six children were living at Creeting St Peter, Thomas a farmer. The youngest, Catherine Sarah, was just two months old.

Only two more children, girls, were born by the 1851 census.  The family were living at Grove Farm. Thomas was a farmer of 112 acres, employing three labourers. All the children were listed so they survived.

In 1861, Thomas was still farming 112 acres at Grove farm, employing six men and one boy. With him are two adult sons, two daughters, and the youngest boy, Edgar, just eight years old. Thomas’ wife and a daughter were visiting a married daughter. (More on the children in the next post.)

In newspaper articles, I found reference to a Thomas Mudd and Frederick Mudd (Thomas’ brother), both farmers, dealing with poachers. However, that Thomas and Frederick are living at Badley and appear to be brothers closer in age than my Thomas and Frederick (who were 20 years apart). That Thomas and Frederick’s parents were William and Ann. They are probably related, Badley being so close to Creeting, but until I’ve done more research, I’ll have to keep the newspaper articles to the side. Confusing.

Thomas didn’t live to the next census. He died on 13 August 1869 at Creeting St Peter, at the age of 62.

willsindexthos

thosipswichjnl17sep1870

Ipswich Journal, 17 Sep 1870

 

Sources: findmypast; familysearch; British newspaper archives; Google; family archives

Save

Save

Staying in Suffolk, I turn to Mary Ann Mudd who was born in 1843 in Creeting St Peter, or West Creeting in Suffolk.  Unfortunately, I don’t have the exact date of birth as I haven’t yet ordered the birth certificate.  Her parents were Thomas Mudd, a farmer, and Eliza Gooch.  Mary Ann was one of nine children, including five boys.

Mary Ann appears, aged 7, in the 1851 census.  The family was living at Grove farm.  Grove farm today is either owned by Poundfield Products Ltd, a concrete product supplier, or by EO who work in the electrical vehicle charging industry, or both.  Both give their address as Grove Farm, Creeting St Peter, Suffolk.  Another company, Alfabloc Ltd, are registered at this address.

grovefarm

Google streetview from entrance to Grove Farm

In 2013, there was a proposal to make the farm a solar farm and, of course, “NIMBY“s didn’t want that (lower the property prices, etc, etc).  It looks like they may have won as there’s no sign of solar panels in Google earth view.  Poundfield Products have also caused ire because of garish cranes.  It’s the pity the farm is no longer just a normal farm.

By the next census, Mary Ann had married William Rose, on 3 April 1860, and moved to Framlingham where William had a mill.  One newspaper notice said the wedding took place at Creeting St Peter’s and another at Creeting St Mary’s church (just down the road).

creetingstmary

It looks to be a nice little church with some lovely stained-glass windows.  Mary Ann was only 17 and William 11 years older.  One wonders how they met.

Mary Ann got pregnant almost immediately and their first child, Fanny Emma, is listed in the 1861 census. Mary Ann’s mother, Eliza, and older sister, Susan, were visiting when the census was taken.

The following year Mary Ann gave birth to their first son, William Mudd Rose.  Something took the couple to London between 1862 and 1867, their second son, John Edward, being born there in 1864.  William senior became a publican in Drury Lane.  They weren’t there long and had moved back to Suffolk where the third son, Charles Robert, was born somewhere in the Bosmere registration district (perhaps Henley).

In 1868, Mary Ann gave birth to her fifth child, a daughter, called Mary Anne.  Sadly, the girl died in September of the following year.  Another daughter, Bessie Emily, was born in 1870.  In the 1871 census the family of seven were living in Henley, William senior a miller.

The following year the fourth son, George Thomas, was born, and two years after that, another daughter, Susannah Ellen, then the following year yet another daughter, Florence Eva.  The couple now had nine surviving children, Mary Ann being almost constantly pregnant.  But they didn’t stop there.

The family moved to Sproughton, Suffolk, where William senior was still a miller.  Between 1876 and 1885 (when Mary Ann was 42) five more girls were born:  Maud Alice, Kate Beatrice, Mabel Mary, Millicent Gertrude, and Ethel Grace.  Incredible.  I don’t have details of when the children died but certainly ten of them lived to adulthood.  I can’t find deaths for Fanny (who married Fred Neale), Bessie, Susannah, Kate, Mabel (who possibly married very late, to Harold Clarke), Millicent, and Ethel.  It’s hard to know if the girls married.

Mary Ann’s husband, William, died in 1893 in Sproughton.  Sometime after that Mary Ann moved to Badley, Suffolk.  I’m assuming that she moved in with her son, William, who was a corn miller and farmer in Badley (but from what date, I don’t know).

Mary Ann died on 13 April 1900, aged just 57.

maryanne21ap1900ipswichjnl

Ipswich Journal, 21 April 1900

millhousebadley

The Mill House, Badley, Suffolk

The probate reads

ROSE Mary Ann of Badley Mill Suffolk widow died 13 April 1900 probate Ipswich 6 July to George Thomas Rose miller Effects £1240 10s 6d

Sources: familysearch; findmypast; Google; suffolkchurches.co.uk; probatesearch; family archives

Save

Save

Back to Suffolk, where William Rose was born in Mendlesham to John Rose and Susannah Ford.  He was baptised on 11 March 1832 in Mendlesham.  He was the eldest of seven children (as far as I know) and had four brothers and two sisters.

Mendlesham is a small village in mid-Suffolk of a population of about 1,400.  It used to be a market town.  It was mentioned in the Domesday book in 1086 as Melnessam.  I presume therefore that the name is pronounced “Mendlesam” and not with the sh sound as I had previously thought.

mendleshammap

mendleshammap2

I would suppose that William was baptised in the church of St Mary, which was founded in 1558.

stmarymendlesham

In 1841 the family of six were living in Market Street.  This is a Google streetview photo of “Old Market Street”, which I assume is the same street.

capture

No occupation is recorded for William’s father in the 1841 census.

In 1851 the family of nine were listed as living in Back Street, which, apparently, is Old Market Street (parallel to Front Street).  Living with them was John Foster, a business partner of William’s father who was a miller, baker, and farmer.  William was 19 and working as a miller.

By 1860, William had moved to Framlingham to the south-east of Mendlesham.  He married Mary Ann Mudd at Creeting St Peter (to the south-west of Mendlesham) on 3 April 1860.

rosemuddwed

The notice below gives a little more information:

rosemuddwed21860

So William was running a steam mill in Framlingham, and married at his fiancée’s home town.  Here’s a map of the region, showing the three towns.

framlinghamcreetingmap

Framlingham was also a market town (or village) of about 2000 people, mentioned in the Domesday Book.  It even has a 12th century castle, so has an interesting history.

The couple’s first child, Fanny, was born in 1861, before the next census.  William, Mary Ann, and Fanny, were living in Well Close Square in Framlingham.  It appears to be a short, slightly curved street.

wellclosesqframlingham

At the time of the census the family had two visitors – Mary Ann’s mother and older sister.  William was indeed a miller employing two men and two boys.  An apprentice and a servant were included in the census.

Between the 1861 census and 1871, the family had moved to London, where William was a publican in Drury Lane, and then to Henley, back in Suffolk.  By then, the couple had had five more children (three of them boys), but a little girl, named after her mother, had died at the age of one in 1869.  In the 1871 census, William was a master miller, employing one man (who was boarding with them), and the family lived in Debenham Road, in the parish of Henley, with one servant.

stpetershenley

St Peters, Henley, where some of Williams children were christened, and one buried

By 1875, the couple had another three children (including another boy).  In about 1876, the family moved to Sproughton, a village three miles west of Ipswich.

By the next census in 1881, the couple had had yet another three children, all girls, born in Sproughton.  William was a miller, employing three men and one boy.  He lived in Sproughton (no address noted) with Mary Ann and their nine children, and one general servant.

In 1891 the address given was the Mill.  I’m assuming it’s the mill house in Sproughton, a photo of which is below (from Flickr) which straddles the river Gipping.

8224207795_58b7f5e70f_k

It’s now a listed building although it has been converted to residences.  I can’t find any history of the actual building apart from physical descriptions.  William and Mary now had seven children living with them, the older ones having married.  William was a miller and farmer, while his youngest son (age 18) was a miller’s assistant.  There were no servants listed, presumably because the daughters were old enough to help out.  William was now 59 years old.  Altogether, the couple had had 14 children!

William died on 24 February 1893 in Sproughton.  The gravestone says he was 59 years old, but as we know he was 59 in 1891, he should have been 61, which tarries with his birth year.

gravewmrosesproughton

The probate read

“ROSE William of Sproughton Suffolk miller and farmer died 24 February 1893 Administration Ipswich 28 April to Mary Ann Rose widow Effects £710 6s”

Sources: Google; findmypast; familysearch; probatesearch; genuki.org.uk; suffolkchurches.co.uk; wikipedia; Mendlesham neighbourhood plan History of the Parish

Save

Just a week ago I signed up for a “free” trial with findmypast.co.uk and in that time, with just two days of research, I have filled in numerous gaps.  Their search engine is vastly superior to ancestry and familysearch.  They only display relevant results which makes a vast difference!  I don’t waste my time clicking on results which do not meet my search criteria.

I had a word file of particular details that I wanted for a range of different ancestors.  Slowly, I have made my way through them and crossed them out as I got a positive result.  I have noted the positive and negative results on my “research log”.

Last week I found the births or baptisms for Thomas Mudd, Elizabeth Potter (also her death), and clarified births, marriages and/or deaths for some of the Rose family.

Today I met with even more success, finding the baptism (and parents) of Mary Chariot and the marriage of those newly found parents, the marriage of John Beale’s parents, the burial of John Cornelius, the burial for Thomas Gruncel, the likely baptism and death of Sarah Kercher (nee Lee), and a baptism for Sarah Barnett.  For years I had been searching for the baptisms of Sarah Exel and Esther Webb, never having found anything remotely possible, but today I found a possible baptism for a Sarah Exall AND I found Esther (aka Hester) Webb!  That was the biggest prize, finding Esther.  Those records were probably sitting there all this time, buried in all the irrelevant results from stupid search engines.  Even when I know exactly what I’m looking for and that it exists, I always drew a blank on both ancestry and familysearch.  Findmypast also has British newspaper records with a good search engine so I have started to find little articles such as John Rose standing for council.

I recently received my DNA results from ancestry.  The ethnicity is not a surprise but ideally I need a subscription to view any matches.  I’m reluctant to give ancestry any money.  I’ve usually found them disappointing (see above comments re search results).  I think I’ll wait until my findmypast sub expires and then think about it.  I’m no hurry.  In the meantime, I have uploaded my results to Gedmatch but don’t really know what to do.  It’s all gibberish to me with its 31.6 cM 4th cousin match.  What is one supposed to do with that information?  Presumably the person you match has a tree with similar surnames?  Who knows?  I need a “DNA for genealogy” for dummies, with them spelling out exactly what to do.  The help I’ve received so far still doesn’t help.  When it comes to numbers, my brain freezes.

In the meantime, I’m happy enough continuing with the more traditional search on findmypast.

The researcher previously mentioned said she must’ve made a mistake, confusing my tree with another’s.  Anyway, she sent me heaps of documents relating to my great-grandfather’s family – marriage, birth and death certificates, maps and information.  Awesome!

I continued with the hints on the family tree and linked census returns and other records to the individuals on the tree.  I already had copies in folders, but for some reason hadn’t linked these.  I did this for Rose and Mudd families.

My ‘Family Tree Maker’ program no longer worked on my 64 bit computer and it seems you have to pay for an upgrade.  I wasn’t prepared to do that.  I’m quite happy with tribalpages.com for a family tree.  I just needed a GEDCOM reader to read the downloaded file.  I had a look at recommendations for free genealogy programs and the three that seemed the most popular were LDS’ PAF, Gramps and Ahnenblatt.  I didn’t like PAF – too simplistic and clunky.  Gramps was a huge file and not intuitive at all.  I didn’t like it.  So, of the three I decided on Ahnenblatt.  It allowed the upload of photos too, which is handy.

As I’ve made a few changes to the online tree, I will have to download another version for Ahnenblatt and re-insert photos – which was very quick anyway.  For some reason I had my maternal great-grandfather’s birth date incorrect, even though I possess a copy of his death certificate.  I really need to go through my physical notes with a fine-tooth comb and double check everything.

I logged onto ancestry.com and found a message from a fellow researcher who thought I had some families mixed up.  I couldn’t see where, so have sent her details I have and asked what she means.

While there, I reviewed some hints and linked a few census returns and BMD details (which I already had saved but hadn’t linked on the tree there).  Other researchers differ on details on the surname of Matthew Darlington’s wife.  Although they appear to have the same person (other details match), one puts his wife’s surname as Malam (which I had) and the other as Johnson.  There are some differences in birth places too so someone somewhere may have the wrong record (although dates seem to be the same).

I had a look at the Rose side of the family and found more details for Hannah Reynolds, connected to the Reeve family.  That’s branching out a bit.

I then looked at hints for Mary Rose, nee Mudd.  I found national probate details at her death in 1900.  She left 1240 pounds, 10s 4d to one of her sons.  I remember my great aunt mentioning something along these lines.  Because Mary had left everything to him, he made sure that his sisters (of which there were 10!) were left money on his death.  I think  he only left it to the younger sisters.  I will have to go back to my aunt’s letter, in which she mentions this.  So, nice to see evidence of the will.

All the above took me a long time and the sun is shining and I have much to do, so I must stop there for now.