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This entry will be brief.

John Rose was born in about 1782 in Mendlesham, Suffolk. He was the son of Robert Rose and Mary Somes. He had one brother that I know of. I  haven’t discovered any other siblings.

I haven’t been able to find his marriage to his wife, Mary (surname?). Their first child, Esther, was born in about 1806. I’ve not been able to find her birth or baptism record. A son, John, was born in about 1809, then another daughter, Rebecca, in about 1814. There may have been children between those dates who died, but no record found yet. Mary Ann Rose was born in about 1815 or 1816. She was the first I found her baptism record for. Depending on which site you access (familysearch or freereg), she was baptised on 2 June 1815 or 2 June 1816. (I guess they had problems reading the last digit.) Another son, Frederick, was born in 1818. He was baptised on 6 December, but died in February, 1819. The last child I know about was Harriet, baptised on 24 September 1820.

The 1841 census for John and his family is very faint, but I can make out that he was a smith, age 60, Mary, his wife, age 50, then two daughters, Mary (it looks like), and Harriet. Listed with them is someone who appears to be 80 years old with the surname Bent (?). I can’t make out the first name.  If anyone can read it, do let me know.

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Perhaps a mother-in-law? They were living in Mendlesham.

Daughters, Esther and Rebecca, had died in 1828 and 1830 respectively.

Of course, in 1851, it was just John and Mary. John, at age 71, was a farmer and innkeeper. Mary was 61, born in Wetheringsett, Suffolk.

John lived another seven years, and died on 23 July 1858 in Mendlesham.

“ROSE John. Effects under £100 22 January. The will of John Rose late of Mendlesham in the county of Suffolk Blacksmith deceased who died 23 July 1858 at Mendlesham aforesaid was proved at Bury St Edmund’s by the oath of John Rose of Mendlesham aforesaid Farmer the Son and the sole Executor.”  (from probatesearch website)

He was buried on 29 July in Mendlesham.

Mary died four years later, and was buried on 13 March 1862.

Sources: findmypast; familysearch; freereg; probatesearch

Now to Gabriel’s wife, Hannah.

Hannah Reynolds was born on 4 October 1801 in Ipswich, Suffolk. She was baptised on the 26th at St Matthew, Ipswich. Her parents were Robert Reynolds and Mary Milbourn.  She was the second child (and second girl).  She had two sisters and two brothers as far as I know.

As previously mentioned, she married Gabriel Reeve on 14 May 1821 at St Mary at the Elms in Ipswich.

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It’s possible that her father-in-law was a parish clerk there. Interesting also, is that it’s on the corner of Black Horse Lane (where the couple lived 50 years later).

Their first child, Gabriel Benjamin, was born on 7 April 1822.  Two years later Robert was born on 5 March. Another two years on and John was born on 30 March 1826. Sadly he died in June 1827. On 27 December of that year another son was born and was named John Gabriel. Sadly, he also died, in 1830. On 30 November 1829 Edward was born, then in 1831 twins – Henry and Hannah (the only girl) who were born on 23 May.  In 1833 yet another son was born on 25 May and he was also given the name of John.  He, at least, survived to adulthood. In 1841 Joseph was born, and baptised on 1 August, so was probably born after the census. It appears that he also died young, at the age of four in 1846. The last child, another son, Thomas Edward, was born between April and June in 1844.

So, in the 1841 census, out of eight children born only Gabriel B, Robert, Henry, and John (the younger) are listed. Two children had died, but Edward and Hannah (Henry’s twin) are missing. Edward also appears to have died less than a year after his birth.  I’ve not been able to find Hannah, who would have been nine or ten years old. It’s possible she died earlier that year but the burial index doesn’t give an age at death. She may have been visiting a relative but I can’t find any likely candidates.

By the 1851 census, Gabriel B and Robert had married (Hannah Wright and Hannah Polley respectively). Henry, John, and Thomas were still living with Gabriel and Hannah. Henry, 19, was a painter and glazier like his father. John, age 17, was a pupil teacher at the Church of England. Thomas was only six years old.

No census found for 1861, sadly.  John seems to have married during this time.  Thomas Edward married Mary Rouse in 1865.  In the 1871 census Hannah and Gabriel were living at the Black Horse Lane address with their son, Thomas (also a painter and glazier) and grandson (Thomas’ son), Thomas Herbert, age 5. I cannot find Thomas’ wife. He was listed as married, so she hadn’t died.

Hannah died on 31 December 1872. (Less than eight months later her husband died.) She was 71.

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Sources: familysearch; family archives; waymarking.com; findmypast; British newspaper archive; Google

I’m a week behind again, sorry.

This week I turn to Gabriel Reeve, the father of Gabriel Benjamin Reeve, my great-great grandfather.  He was born in about 1800, baptised on 26 May of that year at St Clement in Ipswich, Suffolk. He was the son of Gabriel Reeve (possibly a parish clerk) and Ann Brown. I have not found any siblings yet.

He married Hannah Reynolds on 14 May 1821 at St Nicholas in Ipswich. At the time of the birth of their first child (Gabriel Benjamin) in 1822, Gabriel was listed as a painter. Over the next 20 years the couple had another eight children (details in the next post). However, not all survived and only four children are listed on the 1841 census. Some, of course, could have been visiting relatives at the time. I’ll explore that in the next post. The family were living at Coytes Garden in the parish of St Nicholas, Ipswich.  One more child was born in 1844.

In 1851 Gabriel was described as a painter and glazier living at 104 Austin Street in the parish of St Mary at the Elms in Ipswich. According to Google streetview this is the address, or somewhere on the left-hand side of the street.

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Three sons were living with them, ages from 6 to 19.

Unfortunately, I’ve not been able to find Gabriel and Hannah in the 1861 census. Freecen is completely useless. Apparently there were no Reeves in Suffolk that year, which is absolutely ridiculous as I have the 1861 census for their son, and FindMyPast lists four (only one of which is a maybe, but I don’t currently have a subscription).

Gabriel was for many years a foreman at the business of D & E Haggar in King Street in Ipswich. They were a firm of plumbers, gasfitters, painters and glaziers.   I found this interesting account of a fatal accident at the business and Gabriel was a witness at the inquest.

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Men obviously worked well into their 70s then as it was their only income and they often still had families to support.

In the 1871 census, Gabriel, Hannah, and two sons were living at 11 Black Horse Lane in Ipswich, not far from Coytes Gardens, and a short walk from King Street. The original buildings are no longer standing. This is the address from Google streetview.

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King Street looks charming.

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As expected Gabriel was still a painter and glazier at about age 70.

Sadly, Gabriel’s wife, Hannah, died in 1872.

Gabriel died the following year, on 24 August.

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Ipswich Journal, 30 August 1873

 

Sources: findmypast; British newspaper archive; family archives; Google

Eliza Gooch was likely born about 1809 or 1810. The only record I can find is for a birth on 11 August 1808 at Ipswich, Suffolk, and baptism on 22 April 1810 at Bury St Edmonds (or alternatively Bury St Mary, depending on which website you look at), Suffolk, daughter of William Gooch and Mary Lenny.

However, the announcement of her marriage to Thomas Mudd states that her father was George Gooch, merchant.  Perhaps his name was William George or George William. I have, so far, been unable to find the birth or baptism of an Eliza, daughter of a George.

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If her father was William, she had at least four other siblings, one of which was a girl (and Eliza is George’s only daughter by 1829).  Some more research on George Gooch is needed.

In any case, after marrying Thomas Mudd, Eliza lived at Creeting St Peter on her husband’s farm.  Unfortunately, as I have no real information on the wives of ancestors, Eliza included, I have to concentrate on the children.

Their first child, George Thomas (indicating that yes, her father’s name was George), was baptised in 1830. I don’t have the details yet.  The second child, William Benjamin (perhaps her father was George William) was born in about 1833, but not baptised until 30 June 1837 at Creeting St Peter. Also baptised on that day was a daughter, Susan Elizabeth, who was born in about 1834, and another son, John Marmaduke, born about 1836. The next son, Richard, must have been born after June 1837 because he was baptised on 26 October 1837.  And finally, before the census, Catherine Sarah was born in about April 1841.  She was not baptised until 29 May 1852 (or 1853, again depending on which website you look at).

Mary Ann was born in about 1843 and baptised on the same day as her sister Catherine (this time it’s stated as 1853). The third child to be baptised on the same day (they believed in batch baptisms, this family, and why not if it cost money) was Emily who was born about 1849. This time the year of baptism is stated as 1852, but the same date of 29 May. Someone seems to have had trouble distinguishing a 2 from a 3 (surely it would have been obvious if the entries were in chronological order, having done transcriptions myself).  Just to make matters even more confusing, yet another child was baptised on 29 May “1852”, Edgar Herbert, who, according to census returns, was born in 1853. Thankfully that was the last child and the last batch of baptisms.

The children are all listed on the 1851 census, living in the same place. Edgar had not yet been born.  In 1859 the eldest, George Thomas, married Celia Kerridge, and in 1860 Mary Ann married William Rose. In the 1861 census Thomas was listed with his sons, William and John, and daughters, Catherine and Emily and little Edgar. Eliza and Susan were visiting Mary Ann in Framlingham.  Unfortunately, the fourth son, Richard had died in 1859.

Susan married Isaac Reynolds in 1865. Then in March 1869 George Thomas died before his father (who died in August that year).

Eliza continued running the farm after Thomas died, and in the 1871 census was listed as a farmer of 200 acres employing eight labourers and one boy, so she was obviously doing well. William, Emily, and Edgar were still living with her. Staying with them were three adult nieces, Sarah Anne, Mary Anne, and Jessie Kate Mudd. I don’t know who their parents were. I have found a Sarah Anne and Mary Anne Mudd, daughters of Robert and Mary Ann Mudd, born in Polstead, but have no idea who Robert Mudd is. I can find nothing for Jessie Kate.

Emily married Thomas Cooper in 1872.

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William married quite late in 1876 to Rosa Kerridge.

In 1881, Eliza was still a farmer at Grove Farm, farming 80 acres and employing two men and a boy. Her son, John, was farming the rest, 112 acres, employing three men and a boy. Living with them both was Edgar, age 28. He never married, and I don’t think John did either.

Eliza died, still at the farm, on 3 June 1888.

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Sources: familysearch; findmypast; British newspaper archives; family archives

 

I’m late again with updating. Week 32 will be in a few days.

Thomas Mudd was born on 26 June 1807 in Badley, Suffolk, and baptised on 16 September the same year. His parents were Richard Mudd and Ann Cooper who had 10 children. Thomas, as far as I know, was the third child (and second son).  I think Richard was a farmer.

Thomas was only 18 when he married his first wife, Susannah Maria How, on 19 September 1825 at Haughley, Suffolk. Sadly, she died the following year in Haughley.

It was three more years before the widower, Thomas, married Eliza Gooch on 30 September 1829 in Ipswich.  Their first son, George, was born in 1830 in Creeting St Peter, Suffolk. By the time of the 1841 census the couple had three more boys and two girls, all born at Creeting or Creeting St Peter. In the census the family of six children were living at Creeting St Peter, Thomas a farmer. The youngest, Catherine Sarah, was just two months old.

Only two more children, girls, were born by the 1851 census.  The family were living at Grove Farm. Thomas was a farmer of 112 acres, employing three labourers. All the children were listed so they survived.

In 1861, Thomas was still farming 112 acres at Grove farm, employing six men and one boy. With him are two adult sons, two daughters, and the youngest boy, Edgar, just eight years old. Thomas’ wife and a daughter were visiting a married daughter. (More on the children in the next post.)

In newspaper articles, I found reference to a Thomas Mudd and Frederick Mudd (Thomas’ brother), both farmers, dealing with poachers. However, that Thomas and Frederick are living at Badley and appear to be brothers closer in age than my Thomas and Frederick (who were 20 years apart). That Thomas and Frederick’s parents were William and Ann. They are probably related, Badley being so close to Creeting, but until I’ve done more research, I’ll have to keep the newspaper articles to the side. Confusing.

Thomas didn’t live to the next census. He died on 13 August 1869 at Creeting St Peter, at the age of 62.

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Ipswich Journal, 17 Sep 1870

 

Sources: findmypast; familysearch; British newspaper archives; Google; family archives

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Susannah Ford was born on 1 November 1806 in Mendlesham, Suffolk. She was baptised at St Mary the Virgin church in Mendlesham on 16 November.  Her parents were William Ford and Mary Annis.  She had two brothers and a sister that I know of.

As mentioned in the previous post, Susannah married John Rose in Naughton, Suffolk, on 12 September 1831. Why Naughton, I don’t know.  It’s about a four or five hour walk to the south of Mendlesham.

The following year she gave birth to her first son, William, in Mendlesham.  Two years later her daughter, Rebecca, was born.  Then on 19 August 1837 her second son, John, was born, and third son, Frederick, arrived on 14 January 1840.  All four children were listed on the 1841 census. I do not have a birth or baptism date for Rebecca.

Fourth son, Charles, was born on 22 June 1842, then Henry in 1846 (baptised on 6 August). Finally, another girl, Emma, was born on 30 December 1847.

Again, all children are listed in the 1851 census, with the eldest, William, listed as a miller.  In 1861 only Charles, Henry, and Emma are still with Susannah and John, their ages, 18, 15, and 13.  Where were the others?  Rebecca had married Robert Mallet in 1859 and was living in Stowmarket; William had married in 1860 and was living in Framlingham; John junior was visiting his sister in Stowmarket (and would marry Anna Last, who was also a visitor to the Mallet household, later in the month); I’ve not been able to find where Frederick was.

In 1871 the family were still in Back Street in Mendlesham. Susannah’s sons, Frederick and Charles were living with them, Frederick listed as a farmer’s son (at age 31) and Charles, a miller, was already a widower at age 29.  He had married in 1867 but his wife, Zillah, died just two years later. (They had a daughter, Eva Augusta, who appears to be a “visitor”, age 3, to the Howlett family – an elderly woman and her middle-aged daughter, in Norfolk – very strange.)  Frederick never married.  Emma was visiting her sister, Rebecca, in Braintree, Essex.  Henry, listed as a boatmaker, was living in Mendlesham with his wife, Emma, and baby daughter.  John junior, a miller, was also living in Mendlesham with his new wife, Sarah, and baby son (his first wife, and a son, had died).

I’ve given some details of Susannah’s children as I don’t have much information on her at all.  The children all survived to adulthood which seemed rare compared to other families in my family history.  By the time of her death Susannah would have had up to 25 grandchildren!

Susannah died on 23 November 1879.  Her age was given as 71 but it should have been 73.

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Bury & Norwich Post, 2 December 1879

 

Sources: family archives; familysearch; findmypast; freereg; British newspaper archives

 

Sorry, I’ve fallen behind a bit.  This week should be week 30, which I’ll do in a couple of days to catch up.

John Rose was born about 1809 in Mendlesham, Suffolk (an agricultural town) according to census returns. Unfortunately, I’ve been unable to find his birth or baptism at findmypast, freereg or familysearch. His parents were John and Mary. He had five siblings – four sisters and a younger brother.

I know nothing about John and his family until his marriage to Susannah Ford on 12 September 1831 in Naughton, Suffolk, to the south-west of Mendlesham.

By the 1841 census, the couple had four children.  They were living in Market Street, Mendlesham.  John’s occupation was listed simply as ‘smith’ and in White’s directory of 1844 he is listed as a blacksmith. The couple had three more children by the time of the next census.

By 1851 it appears that John went into partnership with John Foster.  As Foster & Rose they were listed as miller, baker, farmer, employing 2 labourers and farming 18 acres.  John Foster was about the same age as John Rose and lived with the family in Back Street, Mendlesham.  John Rose and John Foster are mentioned in a notice in 1843, so I expect their partnership had started some time before 1851.

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In a newspaper article of 1858, John Rose was mentioned in a case of perjury. It’s a fascinating, and confusing, account of John Rose being seen with Emma Ruffles. John was not present at the trial as his family would not allow him to appear in such a “disgraceful transaction”.

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(Twelve months’ hard labour was “mercy” – we could do with such sentences these days.)

The Foster-Rose partnership continued to 1861 (farmer and miller). In the census only the three youngest children are still living in the same house with their parents and John Foster. The farm was 70 acres and they employed 7 men and 3 boys.

John’s younger son, also named John and a miller, fell into financial trouble in 1863. John snr and John Foster were trustees.

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John still had a blacksmith’s shop, which he put up for lease or sale in 1867.

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In 1868 he brought attention to the state of the public road past his farm.

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Suffolk Chronicle…County Express, 21 March 1868

In 1869 John complained about one of his workers who had absented himself without leave. The scanned article was a little blurry so I have transcribed it:

Norfolk News 06 November 1869

Hartismere Petty Sessions

The Petty Sessions were held on Monday last before the Rev. T. L. French, chairman, the Rev. J. F. Reeve, the Rev. Ch. H. Chevallier, the Rev. C. Frere, and J. D. Hustler, Esq.

Robert Rosler, laborer, was summoned by his master, Mr. John Rose, farmer, Mendlesham, for absenting himself without leave, on 28th September last. A sum of 5s. was claimed as compensation. Defendant said: I am a “little” guilty. – The Chairman: I suppose we must take that as a plea of guilty. – Defendant: I asked Mr. Rose to raise my wages. I went to work on the Monday, but I did not see the complainant that day, and I left him on the Tuesday night. I never let myself for any time. I had 9s. per week. On the previous Saturday I told Mr. Rose I shall not work for him any more unless my wages were raised. He said he could not do so, and I told him I must go where I could get more wages. – Complainant said: Defendant engaged himself to me as my servant at so much per week. On the Saturday previous to his absenting himself he said to me, “I should be much obliged to you if you will raise my wages,” but he did not give me notice that he was about to quit my service. He came again on the Monday and left on the Tuesday. – The Chairman: Defendant having commenced work on the Monday he ought, by right, to have completed his contract. – Defendant: I settled with him on the Saturday night. – The Bench ordered defendant to pay the compensation claimed with 10s. costs or in default fourteen days’ imprisonment. Allowed a fortnight to pay it in.

In 1871 the partnership was still going strong with John Foster living with the family in Back Street.  John Foster is listed as being a miller and baker employing 2 men and 1 boy and John Rose is listed as the farmer of 76 acres employing 3 men and 2 boys.

In 1876 there appears to have been a “New Doomsday” (or domesday) about which I can find nothing. However, the two Johns are listed.

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By 1881 things had changed. John’s wife, Susannah, had died and John’s business partner, John Foster, had also died in 1877.  John was in the Brewer’s Arms on the night of the census with his son, Frederick, who was a master miller.  John was now 70 years old but still a farmer of 107 acres employing 3 men and 1 boy.

John died two years later on 17 May 1883. He was buried on 25 May.

ROSE John. Personal Estate £266 13s 4d 19 July. The will with two codicils of John Rose late of Mendlesham in the county of Suffolk Farmer who died 17 May 1883 at Mendlesham was proved at Bury St Edmonds by Robert James Mallett of Mendlesham Farmer and John Hayward of Stowmarket in the said county Gentleman and John Rose of Burgate in the said county Innkeeper the Son the Executors.

The farm was sold three years later.

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Sources: findmypast; Google; midsuffolk.gov.uk; family archives; British newspaper archive

There probably isn’t much I can add about Gabriel Reeve’s wife, Hannah Wright.  On a family register, a copy of which was sent to me, her birth date is given as 19 January 1825.  However, her baptism of 29 June 1825 at St Clements, Ipswich, gives her birth date as 6 February 1825 in Lower Orwell Street, Ipswich.  So, a discrepancy there.

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Google streetview of St Clements church, Ipswich

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Google streetview of Lower Orwell Street today, not far from St Clements church

I found baptisms for the same day from five of Hannah’s siblings.  Their parents were John and Elizabeth.  Hannah’s older brother was called John Shattock Wright, born 1815 and I subsequently found a likely wedding of John Wright to Elizabeth Shattock in 1808 in Ipswich.  There may well have been other children but as John and Elizabeth are common names, I couldn’t be sure enough of others to add them.  Hannah’s other siblings were Edward Jennings Wright, Caroline, Maria, and William.  Hannah had the middle name of Cooper.  I wonder if those middle names were surnames from the family.  I haven’t gone beyond Hannah’s parents so have no idea.

The first available census was not until 1841 and I cannot find Hannah at all.  She was not living with her parents and younger brother in Bell Lane, so may well have been working in a factory or as a servant at the age of 16.  As the 1841 census does not give the exact place of birth, it’s difficult to identify her from other Hannah Wrights (apart from eliminate those where she is listed as a daughter).  Hannah’s father was listed as a maltster in 1841 and 1851, as well as at Hannah’s wedding in 1846.  (The maltster prepared malt from grain for brewing beer.)

As we know from the previous post, Hannah married Gabriel Benjamin Reeve on 21 September 1846 and had 11 children in total, at least three of whom died young, possibly four.

The eldest daughter, Hannah, married Robert Stammers but I have been unable to find a record of their wedding (but they appear in a census together).  They had three children that I know of.  John Benjamin Reeve married Nina Bell and they had about seven children.  Ruth married Alfred Long and had three children.  Harry Joseph (or Joseph Harry) married Ellen Turner and they had five children.  The youngest of Hannah’s children, Katherine Alice, died at the age of 16.  The second to youngest daughter, Mary Kate, went on to marry my great grandfather, John Rose (and have seven children).

Hannah’s husband died in 1890, leaving £245.

In 1891 Hannah was still living at 9 Orford Street with her daughter, Elizabeth Sarah, and a 60 year old female boarder living on her own means.  Elizabeth Sarah was noted in the 1881 census as being an invalid from birth.  There were four widows as heads of household living in the street in 1891 (out of nine on that page).

I can’t find Hannah in the 1901 census, yet I found a death for her in 1906.  There is no result in the probate search for her, or in newspapers (where women are pretty invisible anyway).

I have yet to obtain her death certificate so have no more information.

The same descendant who sent me a photo of Gabriel also sent me a photo of Hannah.

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She looks a kind soul.

 

Sources:  Google; family archives; findmypast

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Gabriel Benjamin Reeve was born in Ipswich, Suffolk on 7 April 1822 to Gabriel Reeve and Hannah Reynolds.  He was the eldest of 10 children (nine of whom were boys).  He was christened privately on 10 April 1822.  Perhaps he was sickly?

Ipswich was a substantial trading settlement.  In the early part of the 19th century its population was about 11,000, rising to almost 33,000 by 1851, so at the time of Gabriel’s birth, there was perhaps a population of between 15,000 and 20,000.  Industries included iron foundries, brick making, breweries, and milling.

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Gabriel’s father was a painter and glazier.  Gabriel B had three brothers called John, born 1826, 1827, and 1833.  The first two died in infancy.  At least three other brothers grew to adulthood and married but I don’t know what happened to the other siblings.

In 1841 Gabriel was living at Coytes Gardens in Ipswich with his parents and three brothers.  He was a tailor’s apprentice.

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Google streetview of Coytes gardens

In 1846 Gabriel married Hannah Wright on 21 September at St Nicholas, Ipswich.  Gabriel was a tailor.  The marriage was witnessed by Gabriel’s brother, Robert, and Hannah’s sister, Maria.

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St Nicholas church, Ipswich

The following  year the couple had their first child, Emma, who, unfortunately, died two years later.  In 1849 the second daughter, Hannah, was born.  Two years later, in February, Sarah was born.

In the 1851 census, Gabriel was a railway clerk, seemingly having given up tailoring.  The family of four lived in Barclay Street in Ipswich.  I can only find an Upper Barclay Street (presumably there was a lower), but there’s nothing there but a carpark and ugly (newer) brick building.  It appears that Sarah died later that year.

Two more daughters were born in 1852 and 1854 (Elizabeth Sarah and Emma Maria).  In 1856 another girl, Mary Eliza, was born, but she died in 1859.  The first son, John Benjamin, was born in 1858 and then another girl, Ruth, in 1861.  In the 1861 census,  however, only four children were listed.  Emma appears to have died also.  Gabriel was listed as an iron foundry clerk.  The family were living in East Street Albion Terrace, the terrace apparently joining East Street to Albion Street (so I’ve been told).  I can’t find it on a map, let along Google streetview.  Three more children were born: Harry Joseph in 1863; Mary Kate in 1866; and Katherine Alice in 1869.

In the 1871 census all the surviving children are listed except for John Benjamin, who would’ve been about 12 years old.  It’s possible he was at a “Hospital school” listed as Benjamin Reeve.  Why he would be there remains a mystery.  Gabriel was listed as a merchant’s clerk.

Ten years later, 1881, Gabriel was listed as a commercial clerk at the iron foundry, as was his son John Benjamin.  The family were living at 9 Orford Street in Ipswich (now a carpark).

I have no more information for Gabriel.  He died in 1890 on 6 September, age 68.

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He was buried on 11 September at Ipswich cemetery.

I was sent a photo of Gabriel by a descendant of Gabriel’s son John Benjamin.  He looks a kindly man.

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Sources: findmypast; localhistories.org; family archives; Google; suffolkchurches.co.uk; probatesearch

Staying in Suffolk, I turn to Mary Ann Mudd who was born in 1843 in Creeting St Peter, or West Creeting in Suffolk.  Unfortunately, I don’t have the exact date of birth as I haven’t yet ordered the birth certificate.  Her parents were Thomas Mudd, a farmer, and Eliza Gooch.  Mary Ann was one of nine children, including five boys.

Mary Ann appears, aged 7, in the 1851 census.  The family was living at Grove farm.  Grove farm today is either owned by Poundfield Products Ltd, a concrete product supplier, or by EO who work in the electrical vehicle charging industry, or both.  Both give their address as Grove Farm, Creeting St Peter, Suffolk.  Another company, Alfabloc Ltd, are registered at this address.

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Google streetview from entrance to Grove Farm

In 2013, there was a proposal to make the farm a solar farm and, of course, “NIMBY“s didn’t want that (lower the property prices, etc, etc).  It looks like they may have won as there’s no sign of solar panels in Google earth view.  Poundfield Products have also caused ire because of garish cranes.  It’s the pity the farm is no longer just a normal farm.

By the next census, Mary Ann had married William Rose, on 3 April 1860, and moved to Framlingham where William had a mill.  One newspaper notice said the wedding took place at Creeting St Peter’s and another at Creeting St Mary’s church (just down the road).

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It looks to be a nice little church with some lovely stained-glass windows.  Mary Ann was only 17 and William 11 years older.  One wonders how they met.

Mary Ann got pregnant almost immediately and their first child, Fanny Emma, is listed in the 1861 census. Mary Ann’s mother, Eliza, and older sister, Susan, were visiting when the census was taken.

The following year Mary Ann gave birth to their first son, William Mudd Rose.  Something took the couple to London between 1862 and 1867, their second son, John Edward, being born there in 1864.  William senior became a publican in Drury Lane.  They weren’t there long and had moved back to Suffolk where the third son, Charles Robert, was born somewhere in the Bosmere registration district (perhaps Henley).

In 1868, Mary Ann gave birth to her fifth child, a daughter, called Mary Anne.  Sadly, the girl died in September of the following year.  Another daughter, Bessie Emily, was born in 1870.  In the 1871 census the family of seven were living in Henley, William senior a miller.

The following year the fourth son, George Thomas, was born, and two years after that, another daughter, Susannah Ellen, then the following year yet another daughter, Florence Eva.  The couple now had nine surviving children, Mary Ann being almost constantly pregnant.  But they didn’t stop there.

The family moved to Sproughton, Suffolk, where William senior was still a miller.  Between 1876 and 1885 (when Mary Ann was 42) five more girls were born:  Maud Alice, Kate Beatrice, Mabel Mary, Millicent Gertrude, and Ethel Grace.  Incredible.  I don’t have details of when the children died but certainly ten of them lived to adulthood.  I can’t find deaths for Fanny (who married Fred Neale), Bessie, Susannah, Kate, Mabel (who possibly married very late, to Harold Clarke), Millicent, and Ethel.  It’s hard to know if the girls married.

Mary Ann’s husband, William, died in 1893 in Sproughton.  Sometime after that Mary Ann moved to Badley, Suffolk.  I’m assuming that she moved in with her son, William, who was a corn miller and farmer in Badley (but from what date, I don’t know).

Mary Ann died on 13 April 1900, aged just 57.

maryanne21ap1900ipswichjnl

Ipswich Journal, 21 April 1900

millhousebadley

The Mill House, Badley, Suffolk

The probate reads

ROSE Mary Ann of Badley Mill Suffolk widow died 13 April 1900 probate Ipswich 6 July to George Thomas Rose miller Effects £1240 10s 6d

Sources: familysearch; findmypast; Google; suffolkchurches.co.uk; probatesearch; family archives

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