You are currently browsing the monthly archive for June 2017.

And yes, I’m a week late so today’s should be week 51!

Timothy Kercher was baptised on 30 January 1780 in St Mary Bourne, Hampshire.  As far as I know he was one of seven children, the second son of Thomas Kercher and Sarah Alee or Lee.

St Mary Bourne is a small village in northwest Hampshire. I can’t find a lot of information about it but this website gives a little information even if it is focused on WWI.

Naturally, I have no information on Timothy before he married Esther (or Hester) Webb on 14 November 1803 in Overton (Esther’s birth place).

They had 11 children that I know of, their first son, Charles, baptised in April 1804 in St Mary Bourne. Another son, William, was baptised in April 1805, then Thomas in January 1807. Then came the first daughter, Frances, in 1808. Two more daughters, Jane (baptised October 1810), and Emma (baptised August 1812), then another son, Henry in about 1814. I found a baptism for Henry on 17 April but the mother’s name was put as Henrietta. Another three daughters were born: Sarah (baptised November 1815); Elizabeth (baptised December 1816); and Harriett (baptised August 1818). Lastly, came George baptised July 1821.

The eldest, Charles, married Ann White in 1826.  Frances married Joseph Beal(e) in 1830. Emma (or Emily) married Isaac Smith in 1832. Sadly, George died in March 1834 at the age of 12. Thomas married Isabella Osman in September of that year. Elizabeth died the following year at the age of 18. Sarah married William Lewis in 1838.

In 1841 Timothy and Esther were living in Overton with their youngest daughter, Harriet, and her son, George, born six months earlier. Timothy was a blacksmith.

Esther died in February 1844 in Overton. Her daughter, Frances died in August. Harriet married William Moore in the third quarter of 1844. William, the second eldest, died in 1846. Henry married Henrietta Bartlett in 1848, then in 1849 Thomas died.

I’m not sure if Jane married. If not, she may have died in 1850.

In 1851 Timothy was a widower, still working as a blacksmith, living with his son, Charles and family in West Street, Overton. Charles was a labouring woodman, while his two daughters were silk girls.

Harriet died in 1852 and Charles died in 1859.

It seems Timothy didn’t quite make it to the 1861 census. He had outlived most of his 11 children. Henry died just three years later in 1864. I’m not sure when Jane died, and I can’t find Emma/Emily in the 1861 census.  Sarah was alive with her husband and children. Timothy died on 8 April 1861, at the grand age of around 81.

 

Sources: Google; findmypast; familysearch

Andrew Stevens was born in 1754, baptised on 31 March 1754 in St Ives, Cornwall. He was the son of John and Eleanor.  He had 12, perhaps 13 siblings, some of whom died as infants. Andrew’s father was a lawyer, and then mayor of St Ives. I can find no information of past mayors (even a list) of St Ives. The only website I could find listed mayors from the 19th century, as if mayors (or St Ives) didn’t exist before then. Even John Knill (a surname that crops up in the family) wasn’t mentioned. Disappointing.

St Ives is an old and well-known seaside town, known for its artists’ colony among other things. A civic history timeline can be found here.

StIves

Andrew married Honor Facey (whose mother was Gertrude Knill) on 6 March, 1781 in Werrington, Devon (now part of Cornwall).

The couple had six children that I know of. Lenora Penrose Stevens was baptised 4 January 1782 in St Ives. Her middle name was her paternal grandmother’s surname. Gertrude Knill Stevens (named after her maternal grandmother above) was baptised on 5 July 1783. The first son, Vivian Francis, was baptised 17 November 1784. Andrew had had two younger brothers called Vivian (one of them named Vivian Francis) both of whom died in infancy. George Facey Stevens was born next in about 1790 (his middle name being his mother’s surname). I don’t know if any children were born between 1784 and 1790. It seems likely, but I could find no baptisms during that period. There were two burials of young children in 1785 and 1787 in St Ives of a Mary and a William, aged 8 months and 3 years respectively, but no mention is made of the parents. Another five years passed before Emmeline Escott (or Eskourt) Stevens and Edwin are baptised on 25 August 1795 – twins? Again there are burials of infants in that five years but hard to say if Andrew and Honor had any more children apart from the six mentioned.

I have no further information about the life of Andrew. I don’t even know what he did. I have found no newspaper articles about his family, sadly, even though his father was a mayor.

Three of the children married in 1814. The youngest daughter, Emmeline, was the first to marry, to a naval man, George Hubert Rye, in January of that year. In April, her brother, George, married Honour Langdon. Then eldest sister, Lenora, married John Kernick in December.

George Rye had an interesting life. He was a midshipman in the Royal Navy and was involved in a few battles of the time (Copenhagen and Netherlands) before retiring in 1823 due to fever and becoming a commander of the coastguard of St Ives, capturing a French slave ship, and shooting a man in a “smuggling affray”.* He and Emmeline had five sons and a daughter: Hubert, Edward, Walter, George, Frederick, and then Emmeline on 5 January 1824. Sadly, mother and daughter died during or shortly after childbirth, both being buried on the same day on 7 January. It did say on the child’s private baptism record that her father was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy which seems to contradict the above information. Perhaps George retired shortly after the death of his wife and daughter to be there for his remaining children. This seems more likely.

Andrew was resident at Portreath in November 1830, when he died at the age of 76 from dropsy. He was buried in the parish of Illogan on 17 November.

Andrew’s wife, Honor, died just a couple of months later, being buried on 17 January 1831 in Illogan. Their daughter, spinster, Gertrude, married widower, George Rye, in December of that year. They had no further children.

 

Sources: familysearch; findmypast; Cornwall OPC database; Google; wikipedia; stives-town.info; *”The Genealogist”, 1877, archive.org/stream/genealogist;

I’m over a week late with this one. I had a brief draft ready but hadn’t got round to posting it.

Thomas Grunsell was baptised on 27 May 1764 in Stoke Charity, Hampshire. He was the son of Thomas Gruncel and Mary Poor. He had an older sister, Sarah, and two younger brothers, William and Charles.

I don’t have much information on Thomas (it’s difficult as you get further back). He married Mary Chariot on 22 March 1792 in Micheldever, Hampshire.  Their first child, John, was baptised in August of that year, so Mary was another pregnant bride. Ten more children were born over the next 24 years: Mary (1794); Thomas (1796); Rebecca (1797); William (1798); Sarah (1801); Elizabeth (1803); James (1805); Henry (1810); Joshua (1815); and (I think) Charles (1816). All were born in Micheldever.

Thomas died just eight years after the birth of Charles and was buried on 18 February 1824.

Mary lived on to 1854 and was listed both in the 1841 and 1851 census with her son, James (agricultural labourer) and his family of wife and children. Living with the family in 1841 was James’ younger brother, Charles and in 1851, James’ younger brother Joshua, also an agricultural labourer). I  haven’t seen the original of the 1841 census yet (no current sub to FMP).

Mary was buried in Micheldever on 3 April 1854.

You can see from my source list that there is much that I have yet to find out and confirm.

 

Sources: familysearch

Joseph Asher was born around 1790 in Barrow upon Trent in Derbyshire, and baptised on 7 March of that year in Swarkestone, Derbyshire.  You can see below that Barrow upon Trent (or Barrow on Trent) is just to the north of Coalville and Ibstock where the family settled in later years.

BarrowonTrent

A quiet village, it was mentioned in the Domesday Book so has been around for a long time. The church of St Wilfred dates from the 13th century.  I can’t find much more about it. I assume it was an agricultural area.

Joseph was the son of Joseph Asher and Elizabeth Potter. He had two brothers and three sisters that I know of – William, Sarah, John, Ann, and Martha, who all lived to adulthood.

Joseph married Sarah Heap (daughter of Edward and Elizabeth of Smisby, Derbyshire) on 24 October 1811 in Netherseal, Derbyshire, to the south-west.

Their first son, Joseph (there are generations of Josephs), was baptised in Smisby on 12 December 1813. I found a daughter, Elizabeth, baptised to Joseph and Sarah in Smisby on 18 October 1812. Another daughter, Mary, was born in around 1815 in Smisby, baptised on either the 17 or 19 September. Then Hannah was baptised on 4 October 1819 in Measham, Derbyshire.  Thomas was then born in 1823 in Ibstock and the last apparent child of the marriage, John William, was baptised on 15 May 1826 in Measham.

Sadly, Sarah must have died sometime after John’s birth in 1826 and before 1832, when Joseph married widow, Mary Kirby (née Thomas), in December of that year. I have not been able to find a death record for Sarah. Mary had four children from her marriage to Richard Kirby (although one died as a baby).  Together Joseph and Mary had two more children – daughters Eliza in 1832 and Jane (the name of Mary’s deceased infant) in 1834. The youngest child of Mary’s first marriage, Caroline, was listed with the young family in the 1841 census. Joseph was listed as an agricultural labourer, but by 1847 he was a farm bailiff at Ibstock colliery.

advrtDerbyMerc29Sep1847

Derby Mercury, 29 September 1847

In 1851, Joseph, Mary and Jane were living next door to Joseph’s son, Thomas and his family. Joseph was still a farm bailiff, while his son was a waggoner at the Ibstock colliery.

Joseph worked until his untimely death at the colliery in 1859.

JosAshdthLeicChron6Aug1859

Leicester Chronicle, 6 August 1859

Josephinquest1859LeicesterMerc6Aug

Leicester Mercury, 6 August 1859

 

Sources: wikipedia; familysearch; findmypast; Google; derbyshire.uk.net; British newspaper archive