Sorry, I’ve fallen behind a bit.  This week should be week 30, which I’ll do in a couple of days to catch up.

John Rose was born about 1809 in Mendlesham, Suffolk (an agricultural town) according to census returns. Unfortunately, I’ve been unable to find his birth or baptism at findmypast, freereg or familysearch. His parents were John and Mary. He had five siblings – four sisters and a younger brother.

I know nothing about John and his family until his marriage to Susannah Ford on 12 September 1831 in Naughton, Suffolk, to the south-west of Mendlesham.

By the 1841 census, the couple had four children.  They were living in Market Street, Mendlesham.  John’s occupation was listed simply as ‘smith’ and in White’s directory of 1844 he is listed as a blacksmith. The couple had three more children by the time of the next census.

By 1851 it appears that John went into partnership with John Foster.  As Foster & Rose they were listed as miller, baker, farmer, employing 2 labourers and farming 18 acres.  John Foster was about the same age as John Rose and lived with the family in Back Street, Mendlesham.  John Rose and John Foster are mentioned in a notice in 1843, so I expect their partnership had started some time before 1851.

1843john

In a newspaper article of 1858, John Rose was mentioned in a case of perjury. It’s a fascinating, and confusing, account of John Rose being seen with Emma Ruffles. John was not present at the trial as his family would not allow him to appear in such a “disgraceful transaction”.

1858perjurya

1858perjuryb

(Twelve months’ hard labour was “mercy” – we could do with such sentences these days.)

The Foster-Rose partnership continued to 1861 (farmer and miller). In the census only the three youngest children are still living in the same house with their parents and John Foster. The farm was 70 acres and they employed 7 men and 3 boys.

John’s younger son, also named John and a miller, fell into financial trouble in 1863. John snr and John Foster were trustees.

1863bankruptcygazettejohn

 

John still had a blacksmith’s shop, which he put up for lease or sale in 1867.

1867blacksmithsalejohn

In 1868 he brought attention to the state of the public road past his farm.

capture

Suffolk Chronicle…County Express, 21 March 1868

In 1869 John complained about one of his workers who had absented himself without leave. The scanned article was a little blurry so I have transcribed it:

Norfolk News 06 November 1869

Hartismere Petty Sessions

The Petty Sessions were held on Monday last before the Rev. T. L. French, chairman, the Rev. J. F. Reeve, the Rev. Ch. H. Chevallier, the Rev. C. Frere, and J. D. Hustler, Esq.

Robert Rosler, laborer, was summoned by his master, Mr. John Rose, farmer, Mendlesham, for absenting himself without leave, on 28th September last. A sum of 5s. was claimed as compensation. Defendant said: I am a “little” guilty. – The Chairman: I suppose we must take that as a plea of guilty. – Defendant: I asked Mr. Rose to raise my wages. I went to work on the Monday, but I did not see the complainant that day, and I left him on the Tuesday night. I never let myself for any time. I had 9s. per week. On the previous Saturday I told Mr. Rose I shall not work for him any more unless my wages were raised. He said he could not do so, and I told him I must go where I could get more wages. – Complainant said: Defendant engaged himself to me as my servant at so much per week. On the Saturday previous to his absenting himself he said to me, “I should be much obliged to you if you will raise my wages,” but he did not give me notice that he was about to quit my service. He came again on the Monday and left on the Tuesday. – The Chairman: Defendant having commenced work on the Monday he ought, by right, to have completed his contract. – Defendant: I settled with him on the Saturday night. – The Bench ordered defendant to pay the compensation claimed with 10s. costs or in default fourteen days’ imprisonment. Allowed a fortnight to pay it in.

In 1871 the partnership was still going strong with John Foster living with the family in Back Street.  John Foster is listed as being a miller and baker employing 2 men and 1 boy and John Rose is listed as the farmer of 76 acres employing 3 men and 2 boys.

In 1876 there appears to have been a “New Doomsday” (or domesday) about which I can find nothing. However, the two Johns are listed.

1876fosterrosedomesday

1876fosterrosedoomsday2

By 1881 things had changed. John’s wife, Susannah, had died and John’s business partner, John Foster, had also died in 1877.  John was in the Brewer’s Arms on the night of the census with his son, Frederick, who was a master miller.  John was now 70 years old but still a farmer of 107 acres employing 3 men and 1 boy.

John died two years later on 17 May 1883. He was buried on 25 May.

ROSE John. Personal Estate £266 13s 4d 19 July. The will with two codicils of John Rose late of Mendlesham in the county of Suffolk Farmer who died 17 May 1883 at Mendlesham was proved at Bury St Edmonds by Robert James Mallett of Mendlesham Farmer and John Hayward of Stowmarket in the said county Gentleman and John Rose of Burgate in the said county Innkeeper the Son the Executors.

The farm was sold three years later.

1886farm

Sources: findmypast; Google; midsuffolk.gov.uk; family archives; British newspaper archive

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